How Much Do Bank Tellers Make?

Bank tellers are responsible for the accurate processing of transactions, including cashing checks, making deposits, collecting loan payments, and preparing specialized types of funds. Tellers are considered to be the front-line staff of all banking institutions, which means the job description also includes answering questions from customers, counting cash, and keeping detailed records of all transactions electronically. Not only does the profession require expertise in accounting and finances, but also solid communication and personal interface skills.

Salary
How much does a bank teller make? According to the May 2012 records from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the 541,770 full-time bank tellers employed nationwide earned a mean annual salary of $25,790, or a mean hourly wage of $12.40. The bottom ten percent earned as little as $19,630, while the top ten percent brought home as much as $34,320 annually. Part-time bank tellers earned the same average hourly wages, with the lowest tenth percentile earning an average of $9.10 and the highest making $15.70 an hour. However, part-time tellers only work from a minimum of one hour up to 34 hours each week, earning between $12.00 and $408.00 weekly.

The majority of tellers, around 90 percent, worked for depository banks and earned an annual income slightly higher than average at $25,830. State governments were the top paying industry for this profession, with tellers making an annual salary of $40,420. Additional statistics found that the highest-paying bank tellers were from Alaska at a median annual salary of $29,290, with Massachusetts coming in at a close second at $28,371 annually. Within the right industry and location, a career as a bank teller can be quite lucrative for support administrative professions.

State Hourly Wage Average Salary Number of Jobs
Alabama $11.85 $24,640 10,610
Alaska $14.25 $29,640 1,330
Arizona $12.57 $26,150 7,300
Arkansas $11.14 $23,170 6,600
California $13.29 $27,650 54,810
Colorado $13.10 $27,250 8,190
Connecticut $14.38 $29,910 5,300
Delaware $12.10 $25,160 2,170
Florida $13.29 $27,640 36,170
Georgia $12.74 $26,510 13,460
Hawaii $12.46 $25,920 2,230
Idaho $11.90 $24,750 2,610
Illinois $12.10 $25,180 25,910
Indiana $11.46 $23,830 12,790
Iowa $12.18 $25,330 8,750
Kansas $11.29 $23,480 6,170
Kentucky $11.30 $23,490 7,260
Louisiana $11.37 $23,650 10,190
Maine $12.02 $24,990 3,030
Maryland $12.96 $26,960 8,960
Massachusetts $13.65 $28,390 11,930
Michigan $12.16 $25,300 15,450
Minnesota $12.26 $25,510 9,120
Mississippi $11.38 $23,670 5,270
Missouri $11.36 $23,630 11,660
Montana $11.84 $24,620 2,270
Nebraska $11.39 $23,690 4,860
Nevada $13.20 $27,450 4,520
New Hampshire $12.68 $26,380 1,960
New Jersey $13.21 $27,490 18,890
New Mexico $11.32 $23,550 2,970
New York $12.93 $26,890 31,060
North Carolina $12.93 $26,880 14,100
North Dakota $11.76 $24,460 2,080
Ohio $11.75 $24,440 22,210
Oklahoma $10.54 $21,920 7,790
Oregon $12.51 $26,020 6,310
Pennsylvania $12.14 $25,260 24,790
Rhode Island $13.75 $28,590 1,900
South Carolina $12.37 $25,730 7,260
South Dakota $11.40 $23,720 2,050
Tennessee $11.79 $24,530 10,620
Texas $11.73 $24,390 39,790
Utah $11.19 $23,280 5,450
Vermont $13.28 $27,620 1,300
Virginia $13.06 $27,160 12,840
Washington $13.48 $28,030 11,190
West Virginia $9.95 $20,690 3,450
Wisconsin $11.64 $24,220 13,140
Wyoming $11.59 $24,110 1,100
Data courtesy of U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Work Environment
The majority of bank tellers find employment in bank branches, where they sit or stand at a computer station and interact with customers to fulfill all transaction requests. Most tellers work full-time schedules of eight hour shifts, following the typical Monday through Friday work week. On the other hand, some tellers work shorter bank hours on Saturday as well. An estimated 27 percent of bank tellers work part-time schedules, which is higher than the average for other similar professions. Due to advancements in technology, mobile and online banking have somewhat lowered the demand for full-time tellers. Employment for bank tellers is expected to experience very little (1 percent) or no growth between 2010 and 2020.